Posted on May 04, 2018
Geoff Schmidt with Ardis Morrow

Geoff Schmidt filled in for Michelle this morning while she is at the 2018 District Conference! Love the tie, Geoff.

 

Viking Tour May 20th!

Viking Tour May 20th!
Final Viking Tour planning meeting May 16 at 7:30 AM at Coffee Oasis. Everyone is welcome. Also, join us May 19 at Western Red Brewery for rider packet pick up and a Rotary social.
 

Frances Malone receives award from Suquamish Tribe

Our own Frances Malone was awarded the Suquamish Tribe—Spirit of Giving: Lifetime Achievement Award. Congratulations Frances. We’re so proud of you!
 

Med Reed Classification Talk

Med Reed Classification TalkEach new member to our club gives a "classification talk" to tell other members something about his or her life and work. Med's dad was in the Navy so he grew up at many Navy bases. Med joined the Marine Corps out of high school. He was slated for OCS but instead headed for the Navy. His assignments include Iraq, Guam, the Pentagon, and a stint in Joint Special Ops. After his twin daughters joined the family he went back to Guam, where as the Logistics lead he was responsible for servicing 115 ships. He is currently assigned as Director of Weapons Systems Support at Keyport. He recently bought a 9 acre property in Seabeck and plans retirement from the Navy in about a year.
 

Featured Speaker—Gene Bullock

Featured Speaker—Gene Bullock
Gene and his wife spend a lot of time on the road in their RV as the “Geritol Gypsies” where they pursue their passion for bird watching and photography. You may recognize him from his monthly column in most Kitsap County newspapers. Turns out birds are big business: Bird watching and photography in Washington contribute $7.4B to our local economies. 
Fossil evidence shows that many dinosaurs were bird-like and had bright plumage. In that case our friend T. rex would be like “the 10 ton road-runner from hell”. The Kitsap Audubon partners with Kitsap Forest & Bay Coalition and has helped purchase and save 4,000 acres of North Kitsap forest and shoreline. This has been done to attempt to mitigate that nearly half of all North American birds are at risk due to climate change that causes their migration routes to change.